Berry Sweet

This week we shared some delicious fresh strawberries from our local folks at Backyard Orchards.  They were absolutely divine!  Not only were they tasty…they were delivered right to our door from one of the owners!  Talk about sweet!  And since National Pick Strawberries Day is coming up on May 20th, I decided to share some health benefits and a strawberry dessert recipe from one of our residents.

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Now I have been obsessed with strawberries since my days as a young girl in the 80s playing with my Strawberry Shortcake dolls.  (Yes, I may be giving away my age.) But I had no idea how good they are for you!  According to organicfacts.net, strawberries have many nutrients, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that contribute to overall health.  These include folate, potassium, dietary fiber and magnesium.  They have 150% of your daily requirement of Vitamin C in a single serving!  Together, these components are responsible for the overwhelming health benefits of strawberries.  Here are 6 of the Top Health Benefits of the Strawberry

  1. They boost your immune system.  Want to stay well and fight off sickness? Eat a healthy diet, rich in this healthy fruit.
  2. They reduce the risk of eye related ailments.  Strawberries are helpful because of the potassium they contain that helps our eyes maintain the right pressure.
  3. Strawberries have even been shown to help maintain normal blood pressures!
  4. They lower the risk of arthritis, gout and cancer.
  5. Strawberries have been shown to help regulate proper functioning of the nervous system.
  6. They also can help prevent heart diseases and reduce cholesterol.

Those are all wonderful reasons to eat strawberries!   And if you are like me and are drawn to desserts with the delicious fruit…here is a link to our website with a finger licking favorite that is perfect to feature your fresh strawberries and just screams summertime.


strawberry

Gardens of Daphne resident Shirley Hartley loves sharing her baking skills.  She has her very own recipe book called “Squirrelly Shirley Cookbook Specials” that has sold over 300 copies. Here is one of her strawberry favorite recipes that she wanted to share!

 


 

Mother’s Strawberry Cakeslice cake

1 box white cake mix

1 small box strawberry Jello

1 cup oil

1/2 cup of milk

4 eggs

1 cup of frozen strawberries, thawed  (do not drain)

1 cup chopped pecans

Mix first 4 ingredients.  Mix in eggs, one at a time.  Add strawberries and pecans.  Pour in greased and floured pans and bake at 350 degrees ( 9″X13″ pan for 40 minutes) or (Two 9″ pans for 20-25 minutes)

Frosting

1 stick of butter, softened

4 cups of confectioners sugar

Combine until smooth-Add 1 cup of strawberries thawed and drained and 1/2 cup chopped pecans

 

 

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Shifting Gears to the New Year

After all the fun and festivities that the holidays bring, it is commonplace for most to begin thinking of making changes to begin a new year.  New Year Resolutions are a good thing for folks of all ages.  Making resolutions regardless of our age, creates a sense of purpose for all of us.  It helps us to focus on the things that are the most important.  Seniors can especially benefit from this if resolutions are made to prevent illness and injury. Making resolutions such as participating in a new physical activity, developing a new exercise routine, or eating better are all good goals for seniors.  But what is the best way to do this and succeed?

Write it Down

Writing down your resolution is only half the battle!  Chart it and not only seniorwriting-052313-vr-tifdocument your defeats, but celebrate your victories!  According to a study by the University of Scranton research shows that only 8% of people achieve their New Year’s goals.  Writing it down puts it in black and white and gives a sense of accountability.  Trying to lose weight or exercise more?  Writing it down or having someone chart it for you will help you track your success.

Keep it Simple

Now most of us have heard of the KISS system.  You know, Keep It Simple Stupid!  Now while this may sound ridiculous, it is rather ingenious.  If you have a simple and small goal that you want to achieve….and you have written it down…well, then it is more likely to stick with you!  According to psychologist Lynn Bufka, “it’s more sensible to set simple small attainable goals, rather than a singular overwhelming goal”.  A resolution to lose weight is a bit more daunting than to just cut out soft drinks.  It’s less restrictive and much more clear cut.  So, pick something small to change and work on that.

Give Yourself a BreakSenior couple having fun in park

If you do have a slip up, don’t give up!  Remember that you are only human.  Have you been dieting and feel like you could eat your weight in chocolate??  Well…don’t do that and try to A-V-O-I-D feeling deprived.  Eat a small piece of chocolate.  Have a cheat day.  Are you trying to exercise more?  Start slowly.  Don’t feel like you must exercise every day if this is new to you.  Maybe your target is walking two or three times a week to start with.
Set yourself up for success and keep your goals realistic.

By taking small steps, making your goals clear and realistic you stand a better chance of making 2017 your best year yet.  You also want to check with your physician first before making any changes to your diet and exercise plan.  If you feel like Assisted Living is a goal for you or a loved one this year, reach out to us today.  Our staff is trained to help our residents with the activities of their daily life.  We would love to welcome you home to a Great Oaks Management Property in 2017.

Banning Blue Christmas

So, what kind of person are you?  Are you the Grinch at Christmas or are you more like Buddy the Elf?  Hopefully you are somewhere in between.  The holidays are not all lights, baking and singing Christmas carols for everyone.  This especially holds true for some seniors.  The songs that stir the hearts of many during the season can evoke feelings of sadness for others.  But the best thing to do is not to allow the blues to get the best of you during the holidays or anytime for that matter.  Here are some tips to help you or a loved one cope and avoid a “blue” Christmas.

senior-holiday

  • Stay Active! Exercise is not only good for the heart it is also excellent for the mind.  By doing reasonable exercise based on your doctor’s recommendations and your ability, you can keep the blood pumping.  It also improves our metabolic rate and increases the production of endorphins which are those natural mood lifters in the brain.
  • Makeover your Mood! Studies show that the simple act of getting a haircut or even a hot shave makes you feel better!  Don’t discount the benefits of a nice pedicure too.  Feeling better about yourself will help make your spirits improve.
  • Eat Better! Now while the holidays offer many opportunities for sweet treats that we may only have once a year, it’s best not to indulge.  While these goodies typically show their havoc on waistlines, they have also been proven to derail our moods and cause depression as well.  So, don’t wait until the New Year to practice better eating.  Everything in moderation and stick to a well-balanced diet.

family-help-bluesThe U.S. National Library of Medicine notes that “some people experience a serious mood change when the seasons change.  They may sleep too much, have little energy, and may feel depressed. Though symptoms can be severe, they usually clear up.”  So, this is not something to minimize.  If you feel that your loved one may need more professional help.  Don’t delay and don’t minimize the situation.  Reach out and show love.  If they are living alone, consider a move to assisted living or to a situation that will help stimulate them socially.  Be sure to keep them engaged.  Remember the way we feel mentally has a huge impact on our health physically.

For more information and a guide to overcoming holiday depression for the elderly check out the link below for article published by the American Medical Resource Institute.    www.aclsonline.us/artcles/the-guide-to-overcoming-holiday-depression-for-the-elderly-and-their-caretakers/

For more information on Assisted Living at Great Oaks Management Properties visit:

http://www.greatoaksmanagement.com

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March is National Peanut Month

How many peanut butter and jelly sandwiches did you eat as a kid?  How often did you come home from school and find peanut butter and crackers with a glass of cold milk as your after school snack?  How many RC Colas have you drank topped off with a layer of salty peanuts?

Many of us associate peanuts and peanut butter with our childhood memories. As we become adults, sometimes we shy away from foods from our childhood.   March is National Peanut Month so let’s take another look at this healthy nut.

Peanuts have more protein than any other nut.  Protein can help keep our muscles and bones strong.  Protein helps us “feel full” and can knock out that between meals hunger pains.  Also, peanuts contain “good fats” so while they taste great, they are healthy.

So, in honor of National Peanut Month, take a hint from your childhood and jazz it up.  How about a peanut pie?  Have you tried a peanut butter smoothie? How about spicy peanuts as an afternoon snack?  Go ahead and have some fun with this healthy nut.

For more helpful information, from nutrition and health topics to assisted living advice, visit us at GreatOaksManagement.com

It’s Time For Soup!

The holidays are over, it’s cold outside, and so it’s time for soup.  Nothing warms a body up like a hot bowl of homemade soup. January is National Soup Month and it couldn’t come at a better time.

Do you have fond memories of a favorite soup, simmering on the stove with the smell welcoming you into the house like a big hug?  Is it vegetable, chicken, or maybe chili?  Are there special events you have celebrated with soup?

The origins of soup are as old as mankind, probably dating back to the Neolithic Age.  Early man used soup to stretch his food supply and to help survive harsh winters when fresh food was not available.  Historically, soup has been used to strengthen people who were ill and to help families stretch their food budgets.

So get out those cookbooks.  Whip up a big pot of your favorite soup to chase away the cold weather.  Go ahead and look for something new, something you haven’t tried before and see if you can find a new favorite soup.

Healthy Eating

eatright

It’s no secret that eating healthy is probably a great life choice to make, no matter your age.  But did you know that age does become a factor when selecting which healthy foods are consumed?  Sodium, added sugars, and solid fats become items that need to be monitored more closely as we get older.  You might be asking “Well then what should I be eating?”.  That is what we are going to talk about today!

Nutrients to Know

There are five main food types that the body needs to stay healthy: proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals, and water.

  • Proteins – Often called the building blocks of the body, good proteins include seafood, lean meat and poultry, eggs, beans, peas, soy products, and unsalted nuts and seeds.
  • Carbohydrates – These are broken into two categories: Simple and Complex. Simple carbs include fruits, vegetables, and milk products as well as honey and sugar. Complex carbs are in breads, cereals, pasta, rice, beans, peas, potatoes, and corn.
  • Fats – These are broken down into four groups: Monounsaturated, Polyunsaturated, Saturated, and Trans fats.  Monounsaturated fats are in canola, olive, peanut, and safflower oils as well as avocados, peanut butter, and some nuts/seeds. Polyunsaturated fats are found in corn, soybean, and flaxseed oil as well as in fatty fish, walnuts, and some seeds. Saturated fats are found in red meat, milk products like butter, palm oil, and coconut oil.  Regular cheese, pizza, and grain or dairy based desserts are also a souce.  Trans fats are found in stick margarine and vegetable shortening.
  • Vitamins – These help the body grow as well as regulate it.  There are 13 vitamins: C, A, D, E, K, and the B vitamins (thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, biotin, B6, B12, and folate). These can be found in vitamins/vitamin supplements as well as in some foods.
  • Minerals – These help the body function.  Some important minerals include iodine, flouride, calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium. Eating a varied diet is the best way to ensure a healthy mineral intake.
  • Water – Seems like a no-brainer, right?  You would be surprised how often health problems can be traced back to dehydration.  Research indicates that seniors are far more likely to experience adverse health effects from insufficient levels of fluid than younger adults. On average, seniors have 10% less fluid in their bodies compared to younger adults.  To read more about staying hydrated, check out our blog post on that topic here!

Here we gave you just a small overview of ways to eat healthier as you age.  If you want to learn more, visit the National Institute on Aging.

For more information on our company Great Oaks Management and senior living communites, visit us at www.greatoaksmanagement.com.

Top Superfoods for People Over 50 (it also never hurts to start eating them now!)

Eating healthy has many benefits, regardless of age. Food provides nourishment and essentials that our bodies need in order to function and maintain stability.  Some foods go the extra mile. They are rich with vitamins, minerals, and other necessities that, while being healthy in general, also boost other areas of our body.  These particular foods are called Superfoods!

Superfoods

Apples – They contain soluble fiber.  Apples can help lower cholesterol and slow glucose intake.  This can aid in keeping your blood sugar at a healthy level.

Asparagus – Lycopene is found in high volume within asparagus.  Lycopene aids in prostate protection and can reduce the risk of prostate cancer.  Asparagus also contains Vitamin A which is important for the eyes and immune system.  In addition, asparagus also contains iron and protein.

 Blueberries – Blueberries, like apples, have high levels of soluble fiber within their tiny blue spheres, but more importantly they contain Vitamins C, Vitamin K, antioxidants, and the mineral manganese which aids metabolism.

  Broccoli – Broccoli is high in fiber, vitamins A, C, B9, and K as well as antioxidants.  These aid your eyes, immune system, red blood cells, bones, and tissue.

Butternut Squash – Butternut squash is practically overflowing with betacarotene, which is essential in maintaining healthy eyes.  The squash also contains Vitamin C and high fiber content.

Dark Chocolate – Dark chocolate contains antioxidants like flavonoids and polyphenols, which can help prevent heart attacks by lowering the chance for clogged arteries.

Coffee – The National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study found that people that drink regular or decaf cofee were less likely to die from heart and respiratory diseases, stroke, injuries and accidents, diebaetes, and infections.

There are plenty of other superfoods available. To learn more about them and other helpful topics regarding Senior Care, visit us at GreatOaksManagement.com.

Preventing Poor Nutrition

Eating well is important no matter the age, but it can become increasingly difficult for seniors to get the proper nutrition their bodies need as they age. Health issues and physical limitations play a role in the rising problem of malnutrition in our seniors.  Poor nutrition and malnutrition occur in 15% to 50% of the elderly population.

Let’s look at the causes of poor nutrition:

  • Decrease in Sensitivity – Senses such as taste and smell can decline with age.  Meals that are not appetizing is less likely to be eaten.
  • Medication Side Effects – Side effects of some medications include reduced appetite, nausea, or simply throwing off taste buds.
  • Poor Dental Health – Dentures that do not fit properly, jaw pain, mouth sores, missing teeth, or other dental problems can make eating difficult or painful.
  • Financial Burden – Sometimes finances play a role.  Groceries can get expensive, making the cheaper, less nutritious options seem like the better solution.
  • Forgetfulness – Dementia, poor memory, or alzheimer’s can cause seniors to get off schedule, eat the same foods over and over, or even forget the last time they have eaten.
  • Depression – Life can get harder as you age.  Loved ones might be far away or simply do not visit as often, bodies start to fail; loneliness takes hold.  Depression can decrease appetites or simply cause one not to care.

Ensuring Proper Nutrition:

  • Offer Better Food Options – There are plenty of nutritionally-dense foods such as peanut butter, seeds, nuts, olive oil, brown rice, whole wheat bread, fresh fruits and vegetables, benas, legumes, meat, and dairy products.
  • Aromas and Flavors – Appeal to the senses.  Intensify flavors and aromas with marinades, herbs, and seasonings.
  • Make it Fun – Make mealtimes a social event.  Maybe make dinner a family event or invite friends over.
  • Healthy Snacking – Small snacks throughout the day also help.  Snacks like nuts, seeds, cheese, and cereals are a great choice.
  • Take Care of the Teeth – Proper oral health enhances nutrition and appetites.  If their teeth or jaw is hurting, get it looked at by a dentist or proper physician.
  • Set Reminders – Sticky notes, calendars, alarms… Anything to help set a routine.

For more information, visit GreatOaksManagement.com.