Harmonica Happiness

According to the article entitled, “When Music Becomes Your Medicine” by Bart Astor, “Music therapy has been around for a long time — Hippocrates was known to have played music for his patients as early as 400 B.C. — but only recently became a recognized medical discipline with board certification.

It is a helpful tool for therapists in treating mental health disease, developmental and learning disabilities, dementia, and acute and chronic pain.”

Our blog this week honors Gardens of Daphne volunteer Patrick Kenny.   Mr. Kenny delights the residents with his harmonica tunes and brightens their days.  As there is a delightful tune played on the harmonica called the “Missippi Mud”…we are including Gardens of Daphne resident Shirley Hartley’s recipe for Missippi Mud.   Mr. Kenny…look for the Gardens of Daphne to be fixing up a sweet treat just for you!  Thanks for your time and dedication to bring joy to all the residents and staff at the Gardens of Daphne.

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Mississippi Mud Recipe by Shirley Hartley

2 sticks of margarine

2 cups sugar

4 eggs

1 1/2 cups flour

1/3 cup cocoa

1 cup chopped pecans

1 teaspoon vanilla

dash of salt

3 cups miniature marshallows

Icing:

1 stick margarine

1 box powcered sugar

1/3 cup cocoa

1/2 cup evaporated milk

1 cup chopped nuts

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  In mixing bowl, beat butter and sugar until creamy.  Add eggs, one at a time, beating thoroughly after each addition.  Sift together the flour and 1/3 cup cocoa.  Fold this into the creamed mixture.  Add pecans and vanilla.  beat well.  Pour into greased and floured 9×13-inch pan.  Bake 30 to 35 minutes.  Sprinkle top with marshmallows.  Bake until marshmallows are melted and starting to turn brown (about 10 minutes).  Remove from oven and cool in pan about 30 minutes.  Icing:  Melt butter in saucepan.  Sift together powdered sugar and cocoa.  Stir sugar mixture into butter along with nuts and milk.  Spread over cake.

Yield:  12 or more servings

Serving Up Sweetness

Elizabeth Andrew once said that “volunteers do not necessarily have the time…they have the heart.”  With that being said I wanted to shine light on one of our many volunteers that brighten our days at Great Oaks Management.  Ellen Dewberry has been volunteering at the Gardens of Eufaula since 2010.  She brightens the days of our residents and shares the word with Bible Study on Wednesday afternoons.  Mrs. Dewberry is one of our shining stars!  In honor of her sweetness we are going to share her delicious recipe for Turtle Cake!  Thank you Ellen Dewberry for your kindness and your servant’s heart.  We at Great Oaks Management love our volunteers who are always being willing to share!

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Turtle Cake

¾ cup butter

½ cup canned milk (use small can)

1 (1lb) bag caramels

1 cup chocolate chips

1 German chocolate cake mix

 

Mix cake mix according to package directions.  In 9 X 13 inch pan that has been greased and floured, pour ½ batter.  Bake for 15 minutes at 350 degrees.  While this is baking unwrap caramels.  Put in bowl and add the butter and milk.  Microwave one to two minutes until melted.  When cake is done, pour mixture over cake.  Sprinkle chocolate chips on top of that.  Pour rest of batter over this and bake for 20 more minutes.

Recipe Courtesy Ellen Dewberry

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Take it from the Senior Class

Ah yes…you can hear the commencement speeches filling the air.  It’s the time of year when young men and women close one chapter of their lives and start another.  So aside from the wisdom that they have gained from their educations up until this point…we thought it might be intriguing to get some advice from a generation that has already been there and done that.  Here is some advice to the Senior Class of 2017 from some of our assisted living seniors.

5 Life Lessons from our Assisted Living Senior Class

  1. Keep your mind open and don’t stress if you have to start at the bottom to work your way up.  You can do it!  Learn the value of hard work.
  1. Knowledge is power.  Continue your education because that is something that no one can take away from you.
  1. Wake up each day with an open mind and a full heart.  Everyone will not always have the same values as you.  Stay rooted to what you know while still showing kindness.
  1. Think before you speak. Run it through your head before it comes out of your mouth.
  1. Save your money.  You don’t have to have everything you want right now.

Good luck to the Class of 2017 from everyone at

Great Oaks Management and our communities.

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Pictured above is Great Oaks Management resident,

Sara Hamrick and her granddaughter Victoria.

Mama Said, Mama Said

Mother’s Day is a time of year when we reflect on the ladies that helped mold and shape us into who we are today.  To get some real pearls of wisdom we reached out to some of our resident mothers to ask them, “What was the most important thing that your Mother taught you?”  The answers are advice that is timeless for all of us today.

Gardens of Wetumpka Resident Juanita Royall said:

“My mother taught me to always be a lady and be truthful because God is watching.”

Gardens of Pelham Resident Carolyn Hayes said:

“My Mother always said never mistreat anyone or it will come back and bite you and to always be kind.”

Gardens of Eufaula Resident Dimple Zorn:

“My Mama taught me how to cook and she taught me how to be a good Mother to my children.”

Gardens of Madison Resident Carole Kleis said:

“My Mother taught me to make the best out of what you have and to love and take care of your family.”

Limestone Lodge Resident Elease Barksdale said:

“My Mom taught me not to be selfish.”

Gardens of Eufaula Resident Mildred Vickers said:

“My Mother always told me to tell the truth and be a good friend.”

Limestone Manor Resident Avis Fox said:

“My mother instilled in me a good, hard work ethic.  I always had a lot of responsibilities even at a young age.  My Mom was a single mother and watching her made me realize what hard work was all about.”

Gardens of Clanton Resident Mary Nell Jones said:

“My Mom taught me to work hard and take care of my family.”

Gardens of Eufaula Resident Betty Sutton said:

“Being an only child gave me a unique perspective.  My Mother was 30 years old when I was born.  When I had my 3 boys, we learned how to care for three small children at the same time together.  She was also a business woman that taught me the importance of never burning bridges in business or in friendships.”

Gardens of Daphne Resident Anna Speer said:

“My Mom taught me to be nice and always act like a sweet southern belle and to give respect to everyone.”

 Limestone Manor Resident Jackie Bridges said:

“My Mom taught me to be the best you can be in everything.”

Gardens of Eufaula Resident Merilyn Crapps said:

“I was taught by my Mother to show love and always respect your elders.”

Gardens of Clanton Resident Lucille Mims said:

“My Mother taught me to raise my children right and have respect for others.”

Gardens of Madison Resident Nancy Melton said:

“My mother instilled family values in me and to love one another.”

Gardens of Eufaula Resident Margaret Slade said:

“I’m thankful for my Mother teaching me to read at age 5 because I always enjoyed reading and getting into a book.”

Gardens of Wetumpka Resident Bennie McDonald said:

“My Mother taught me to be honest and respectful at all times.”

Gardens of Pelham Resident Lula Mae Ott said:

“My Mother said to hold your character up because no one else will do it.”

Gardens of Eufaula Resident Sara Hamrick:

“My Mom told me back when I was a young girl of dating age to remember to always cross your legs and act like a lady.  I think acting like a lady is still important today.”

Gardens of Daphne Resident Shirley Hartley said:

“Mama believed we should follow the Golden Rule and also love everybody the way you want to be loved.”

Limestone Lodge Resident Kay Armstrong said:

“My mother taught me to be fair.”

Gardens of Wetumpka Resident Lily Keener said:

“My Mama taught me to always remember, this too shall pass.”

Gardens of Eufaula Resident Opal Newsome said:

“My Mama always taught us to take care of your responsibilities.  Don’t expect others to do it for you.”

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Conversations with Betty

Assisted living is more than just a place to live.  But for one family, it is actually a tradition.  Resident Betty Sutton shared a picture with us recently of her mother at the Gardens of Eufaula.  The part that makes this story so unique is that her late Mother was also a former resident at the Gardens of Eufaula.  We sat down with Betty and asked her a few questions about her unique perspective as a former sponsor and now resident at the Gardens of Eufaula.  Here is our five question Q & A session.

 

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Question:  Betty, what is your fondest memory of your Mom at the Gardens of Eufaula?

 

Answer:  “I loved how we celebrated her birthdays at the Gardens!  My late son Chip would bring his grill and he would cook for everyone and we would have a wonderful time.  Birthdays are always special at the Gardens.”

 

Question:  What was something that you remember that your Mom enjoyed at GOE?

 

Answer:  “My Mother made a very special friend named Mrs. Teal when she lived at the Gardens.  They were so close and it was so sweet to see their bond.  I remember coming to pick Mother up to go for a ride and her always insisting that Mrs. Teal ride with us.  We took many trips out for ice cream and even to see Christmas lights.  We had a ball!”

 

Question:   What is your favorite part about living at the Gardens?

 

Answer:  “My new “sorority sisters” that I have met at the Gardens that I affectionately call the “Golden Girls”.  These ladies out here are such fun.  We love to pick at each other.  They are really special to me.”

 

Question:  What do you like at the Gardens that really surprised you?

 

Answer:  I was truly surprised how much I would enjoy the friends that I have made.  That may sound odd, but I have many wonderful friends and never imagined that I would find more that would become so dear to me.”

 

Question:  What would you tell someone that might be considering moving to an assisted living?

 

Answer:  “I would tell them to go ahead and take the leap.  You will surprise yourself how well you will adjust.  I know I did.  Don’t hesitate if you have the opportunity to move here.”

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What is the best advice you’ve ever received?

Have you ever heard a piece of advice or words of wisdom that was particularly impactful and stuck with you for a long time? Last week, we asked several men to tell us about their father’s advice and they shared something along the lines of: “Always tell the truth,” “If you want to eat, you are going to have to work,” “Believe in yourself,” “Make prayer a priority,” and “You will never regret having a good education.” There’s a variety of advice that has a lasting impact from “It is always nice to be nice” to “Take life day by day.” Advice is an interesting thing…for example – “Figure out what you love to do, and then figure out how to get someone to pay you to do it.” I don’t know who shared this advice, but it’s good.

Sometimes, it takes just a simple statement to motivate you or help you see more clearly. For most of us, our moms and dads helped us through tough times and they may have shared some helpful advice along the way. As kids we don’t always pay attention, it is not until later years that we understand their inspiring words. Those profound words – “Never give up” were incredibly important to our lives. What about – “Tell your brother that you are sorry.” Whether it’s from grandma, our parents or a friend, good advice helped us build relationships, find happiness and it sticks with us. We are probably putting some of this incredible advice into practice with our children and grandchildren.

Here is another great piece of advice:

Listening is Very Different from Hearing

“The best piece of advice ever imparted to me comes from my mom, who is fond of saying ‘What you say matters less than what people hear and understand.’  As a teacher, she was a brilliant listener, and she used what she heard to build a bridge between what she needed to teach and how the student needed to learn. From that, she taught me to focus my efforts on helping people understand rather than on what I wanted to tell them. She taught me how to hear, and it is the single most important skill in my professional success.” –Courtney Buechert, founder and CEO of creative marketing agency Eleven, Inc.